Other Free Encyclopedias » Medicine Encyclopedia » Aging Healthy - Part 3 » Longevity: Social Aspects - Survival Curves, Rectangularization Of Mortality, Mortality By Cause, Longer Lives And Better Health, Factors Related To Mortality

Longevity: Social Aspects - Future Trends In Life Expectancies

age aging population mortality rogers improvements

Few researchers assert that there will be no future mortality improvement. Although there have been periodic setbacks in life expectancy increases, say, with AIDS, such setbacks are usually of short duration and are compensated for by later improvements in controlling and treating infectious diseases and by further improvements in other causes of death. Thus, the question is not whether mortality will improve in the future, but by how much it will improve, and what age, sex, race/ethnic, and socioeconomic status groups will reap the greatest improvements. Overall, continued changes in health behavior, developments in medical technology, and improved quality of life bode for a generally bright future, most likely with steady increases in average length of life accompanied by an increasingly healthy population.

RICHARD G. ROGERS ROBERT A. HUMMER

See also LIFE EXPECTANCY; LIFE SPAN EXTENSION; LONGEVITY: REPRODUCTION; LONGEVITY: SELECTION; POPULATION AGING.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

ANDERSON, R. N. "United States Life Tables, 1998." National Vital Statistics Reports 47 (2001): 1–38.

FRIES, J. F. "Aging, Natural Death, and the Compression of Morbidity." New England Journal of Medicine 303 (1980): 130–135.

HAYWARD, M. D., and HERON, M. "Racial Inequality in Active Life among Adult Americans." Demography 36 (1999): 77–91.

KEYFITZ, N. "What Difference Would it Make if Cancer Were Eradicated? An Examination of the Taeuber Paradox." Demography 14 (1977): 411–418.

LINK, B. G., and PHELAN, J. "Social Conditions as Fundamental Causes of Disease." Journal of Health and Social Behavior Extra Issue (1995): 80–94.

MURPHY, S. L. "Deaths: Final Data for 1998." Monthly Vital Statistics Report 48 (2000): 1–108.

NAM, C. B.; ROGERS, R. G.; and HUMMER, R. A. "Impact of Future Cigarette Smoking Scenarios on Mortality of the Adult Population in the U.S., 2000–2050." Social Biology 43 (1996): 155–168.

National Research Council. Between Zeus and the Salmon: The Biodemography of Longevity. Edited by K. Wachter and C. Finch. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1997.

OLSHANSKY, S. J.; CARNES, B. A.; and CASSEL, C. "In Search of Methuselah Estimating the Upper Limits to Human Longevity." Science 250 (1990): 634–640.

OMRAN, A. R. "The Epidemiologic Transition: A Theory of the Epidemiology of Population Change." Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly 49 (1971): 509–538.

RILEY, M. W. Aging in the Twenty-first Century. Boettner Lecture, 1990. Bryn Mawr, Pa.: Boettner Research Institute, 1991.

ROGERS, R. G.; HUMMER, R. A.; and NAM, C. B. Living and Dying in the USA: Social, Behavioral, and Health Differentials in Adult Mortality. New York: Academic Press, 2000.

ROGERS, R. G.; ROGERS, A.; and BELANGER, A. "Active Life among the Elderly in the United States: Multistate Life-table Estimates and Population Projections." The Milbank Quarterly 67 (1989): 370–411.

ROGERS, R. G.; HUMMER, R. A.; NAM, C. B.; and PETERS, K. D. "Demographic, Socioeconomic, and Behavioral Factors Affecting Ethnic Mortality by Cause." Social Forces 74 (1996): 1419–1438.

SUSSER, M., and SUSSER, E. "Choosing a Future for Epidemiology: I. Eras and Paradigms." American Journal of Public Health 86 (1996): 668–673.

TAEUBER, C. "If Nobody Dies of Cancer." Kennedy Institute Quarterly Report 2 (1976): 6–9.

WHITE, K. M., and PRESTON, S. H. "How Many Americans are Alive Because of Twentieth-Century Improvements in Mortality?" Population and Development Review 22 (1996): 415–429.

WILMOTH, J. R., and LUNDSTROM, H. "Extreme Longevity in Five Countries: Presentation of Trends with Special Attention to Issues of Data Quality." European Journal of Population 12 (1996): 63–93.

LONGITUDINAL STUDY

See PANEL STUDY; PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES; SURVEYS

[back] Longevity: Social Aspects - Implications Of Past And Future Longevity

User Comments

The following comments are not guaranteed to be that of a trained medical professional. Please consult your physician for advice.

Your email address will be altered so spam harvesting bots can't read it easily.
Hide my email completely instead?

Cancel or